IndustryThe Telegraph Mysteriously Removes “Right to Be Forgotten” Stories

The Telegraph Mysteriously Removes "Right to Be Forgotten" Stories

As part of its effort to combat the so-called "Right to Be Forgotten" rulings, reports say the Telegraph has written stories about the stories it removed.

Here’s a story that is likely to make your head spin.

As part of its effort to combat the EU’s “Right to Be Forgotten” rulings, reports say the Telegraph has begun writing stories about the stories it was forced to remove.

According to Marketing Land, the Telegraph has “removed three stories about removals.”

Matthew Sparkes, the deputy head of technology at the Telegraph, took to his Twitter feed to inform his followers that he would be “writing about old stories people have requested be removed from Google under new EU rules.”

streisand-effect

But don’t fret – it appears the stories have been returned to their rightful place on the Internet. Now, when you click the link below, you will be sent to the correct page instead of an error page, as Marketing Land‘s Sullivan described. On this page, you will find coverage of the stories the Telegraph has been asked to remove.

Telegraph Stories Affected by EU ‘Right to Be Forgotten’

What Do You Think?

Was it simply a glitch in the system or were the stories purposefully removed? Do you think the Telegraph (as well as other organizations following suit) will be under fire for publishing additional information about stories they were asked to remove?

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